1914 Jeannin Stahltaube 1/32 scale by Wingnut Wings build

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stewil
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1914 Jeannin Stahltaube 1/32 scale by Wingnut Wings build

Post by stewil » Sun Jan 27, 2019 8:50 pm

Hi Folks,
This is one amazing aircraft and a very frustrating build that mightily pushed my patience, yet was very rewarding once built. Not sure if you are into WWI or early aircraft history, but if so, the story included with the kit, shown below is for you. If not, just scroll down to the pictures. Enjoy.

The Kit
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The delicate bird-like Taube came to epitomize early German aircraft design. Wealthy Austrian industrialist Igo Etrich based his successful Taube design on the stable gliding characteristics of the Zanonia (now Alsomitra) Macrocarpa seed as described by Professor Friedrich Ahlborn in his aeronautical research paper published in Germany in 1897. Igo began work in 1900 and was joined by his engineer, Franz Wels in 1903 initially developing models and then manned gliders before moving on to motorized versions. Their Etrich 1 Sperling (Sparrow) briefly took to the air in 1909 and was followed in April 1910 by the larger, more powerful, remarkably stable and comparatively safe Etrich II Taube (Dove). Fellow Austrian, Edmund Rumpler was impressed enough by the Etrich II that he obtained a 5 year exclusive license to build the Taube in Germany. Following further successful demonstrations of a 50hp Etrich Taube in October 1910 the Prussian military placed an order with Rumpler for 5 aircraft. Because the underlying aerodynamic principals of the Taube had been published by Ahlborn in 1897, Etrich was aware that it would be difficult to obtain a patent for his design in Germany and this was confirmed when the patent office rejected his application in September 1911. This essentially made Etrich"s design public domain in Germany so that almost anyone with an engine, enough fabric, wire and a few sticks of wood could legally build and sell their own copy of his Taube. Observing the dizzying array of copycat Taubes being churned out by dozens of his competitors, Rumpler simply refused to pay Etrich any license fees, continued to build the Etrich II marketed as the “Rumpler Taube” and became the largest supplier of Taubes to the German military. Etrich sued Rumpler in 1912 and numerous court cases continued between the two until 1930.

"In the Day"
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Ironically, it was “Frenchman” Emil Jeannin (born in Alsace which had only just been ceded to Germany after the war of 1870-71) who was responsible for one of the next most numerous Taube designs to equip the German military, the Jeannin Stahltaube 1914 “Military Type”. Jeannin Taubes of 1912-1913 featured a steel tube framed fuselage and tailplane as opposed to the wood used by most other manufacturers, earning the name Stahltaube (Steel Dove). The “warping elevator” area of the tailplane was ribbed with flexible bamboo as were the “warping aileron” portions of the spruce & ash wings. The fuselage, wings and tailplane were covered with linen. The engine cowlings were sheet aluminium while the cabane and undercarriage struts were constructed from steel tube. These early Jeannin designs were distinguished by a propeller guard which curved from the bottom cabane section up to the nose, support girders under the wings, 100hp Argus 4 cylinder or 120hp Argus As.II 6 cylinder engines, a radiator mounted under the fuselage and vertically sprung undercarriage struts. The propeller guard and support girders were removed for the 1914 Military Type which also introduced a conventional “V” strut undercarriage, Hazet radiators on each side of the fuselage and were powered by 6 cylinder 100hp Daimler-Mercedes D.1 & 120hp Argus As.II engines. There was a single seat Jeannin Stahltaube as well as a kleine (small) version with a shortened fuselage and tailplane. Relatively conventional ailerons have been noted on a kleine version as has a Scheitelkühler (Brow Radiator) mounted above the engine. Emil Jeannin was imprisoned shortly after war was declared but production of his Stahltaube was continued for the German Army.

The model flying in my sky
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Unarmed A type monoplanes such as the Taube designs were utilized for reconnaissance but shortly after hostilities began airmen started carrying small bombs and personal firearms. The wider availability of more suitable B type biplane designs later in 1914 and more powerful, armed, C types in 1915 meant that no Jeannin Taubes remained in front line service after the middle of 1915, with surviving aircraft relegated to training units. Any history of these facinating aircraft here is of necessity very brief, therefore we encourage you to seek out references for a more thorough understanding of the Taube but please note that correct identification of the numerous Taube manufacturer"s design designations still does not appear to be fully resolved over a 100 years later.


1st build the innards, which are sitting on the instruction booklet
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mostly built now
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Observer notes posted in on the bulkhead in front of the front seat.
The translation is a bit of fun someone was having. First section is: Status of trenches 2 km West of Atlantis?
Second one is”scout placement of the Lord of the Rings part 4” And lastly “pickup a few beers for the boys”
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Fuselage internal wiring and an attempt to lighten the control surfaces so that they would appear translucent. If I would do this again will not prime the surfaces and just use a wash because the plastic was already so thin that the sufaces WERE translucent.
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Cockpit placed within the fuselage to test fit.
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Clamping the fuselage when gluing. Needed to have paid more attention to earlier steps because tolerances are so close that to be off by just a wee bit leads to shaving, sanding, and then clamping in order to get the fuselage sides to adhere.
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Freehand painted the etching on the aluminum which took much time. In fact this entire airplane was painted by brush, just like the real thing.
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More later :D
Last edited by stewil on Thu Jan 31, 2019 9:32 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Cheers and Happy Collecting,
Steve

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scalainj
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Re: 1914 Jeannin Stahltaube 1/32 scale by Wingnut Wings build

Post by scalainj » Mon Jan 28, 2019 2:17 am

Incredible detail on these kits. It looks superb
I have Fokker Eindekker from them that i'm building up steam on by building some skill 1 Airfix kits to get my eye back in after a few years away

Like the observer notes. Very good

Did you hand paint that aluminium etching?

Lastly, the last 4 images are not showing up
Andy

British roads have history. Some were built by the Romans. British road investment being what it is, they have only been re-surfaced a few times since.

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stewil
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Re: 1914 Jeannin Stahltaube 1/32 scale by Wingnut Wings build

Post by stewil » Mon Jan 28, 2019 10:05 am

A few more PICS.

Attaching the wings after painting, decaling, and semi gloss clear coating.
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Note the reversed clothes pin clamps
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The external radiators were mounted and the internal brass or copper coolant lines, top & bottom, next to the fire wall were matched to those on the external radiator.
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Elevator warping wires being attached.
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Almost done now as the central wire is attached mid fuselage.
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Topside warping lines
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Finished
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Truly appears bird like
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Gravity fed auxiliary fuel tank. Hose created by stripping copper core from a piece of electronics wire.
The hose was probably not clear in 1914 but I like the look.
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Loving that curious exhaust
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The brake was a hook that clawed the ground.
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Top view
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Flying with it's later cousins. The evolution of aircraft and air warfare was stunning and created a blueprint for the future.
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Five Germans now chasing Snoopy. Next in line is to be Max Immelmann's Fokker Eindecker E II. It will fly just ahead of the Taube. The E II kit appears to be an easier build than this one. YEA!
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A few final shots.
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To see more WWI aircraft models go to:
viewtopic.php?f=19&t=11994
Last edited by stewil on Tue Jan 29, 2019 12:59 pm, edited 3 times in total.
Cheers and Happy Collecting,
Steve

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David MG
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Re: 1914 Jeannin Stahltaube 1/32 scale by Wingnut Wings build

Post by David MG » Mon Jan 28, 2019 10:13 am

Stunning work. Well done.
Cheers,
David
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k1w1taxi
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Re: 1914 Jeannin Stahltaube 1/32 scale by Wingnut Wings build

Post by k1w1taxi » Wed Jan 30, 2019 2:47 am

Well done Stew. Love these Wingnut kits. Are you saving up for their Lancaster?

Read a fascinating book early last year titled Marked For Death which was a history of Aerial Warfare in WW1.With a 30% casualty rate in British TRAINING it was not a long term career. Also quite eye opening about the politics between the services (which had a lot to do with the causes of that casualty rate)

Look forward to seeing the Eindekker when finished.

Cheers
Lee

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stewil
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Re: 1914 Jeannin Stahltaube 1/32 scale by Wingnut Wings build

Post by stewil » Wed Jan 30, 2019 6:36 pm

Hi scalainj,
You said or asked,
I have Fokker Eindekker
and I am looking forward to seeing it as well as your Airfix models.
Like the observer notes. Very good
Inspired from the Hobbit and Lord of the Rings trilogy because Peter Jackson, who created the movies also essentially created the Wingnut Wings model company.
Did you hand paint that aluminium etching?
Yes, and everything else on the model too other than the decals and clear coat.

And Thank You too David MG for your comments and Lee - No Lancaster for me and have read Marked For Death and agree with your observation concerning it.
Cheers and Happy Collecting,
Steve

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Tom
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Re: 1914 Jeannin Stahltaube 1/32 scale by Wingnut Wings build

Post by Tom » Fri Feb 01, 2019 7:27 am

Very, VERY nice build. Love the detail you'll never see again...
As for the notes: Atlantis might be Artillery.

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stewil
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Re: 1914 Jeannin Stahltaube 1/32 scale by Wingnut Wings build

Post by stewil » Wed Feb 06, 2019 8:35 am

Thanks Tom,
Very, VERY nice build. Love the detail you'll never see again...
So true, have often thought I should leave off the engine panels in order to see the detail. It is also why I inverted the Baron's Fokker in order to see into the cockpit and the machine gun's detail.
As for the notes: Atlantis might be Artillery.
Makes more sense though I did have a native German translate the notes. Now I understand why he placed a ? mark next to that portion of the translation.
Cheers and Happy Collecting,
Steve

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Ozmac
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Re: 1914 Jeannin Stahltaube 1/32 scale by Wingnut Wings build

Post by Ozmac » Wed Feb 06, 2019 2:07 pm

Congratulations on a really lovely build of such a fascinating plane. Those early WW1 planes are a terrific group to build, so much imagination in their designs.

And I like the way you have them circling each other on your ceiling. Well done, Stew!

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Tom
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Re: 1914 Jeannin Stahltaube 1/32 scale by Wingnut Wings build

Post by Tom » Sun Feb 10, 2019 12:27 pm

Quite understandable that the translator had a hard time reading the decal. So did I.

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LUW
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Re: 1914 Jeannin Stahltaube 1/32 scale by Wingnut Wings build

Post by LUW » Mon Feb 11, 2019 6:21 am

Such a beautiful model! Looks terrific!
And I envy your work - not that I was any good in the past, but nowadays my eyes won't permit me that kind of job.
:checkered_flag: Luciano :checkered_flag:

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You know why Italians speak with their hands? Because they have to work a lot on their engines.

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David MG
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Re: 1914 Jeannin Stahltaube 1/32 scale by Wingnut Wings build

Post by David MG » Mon Feb 11, 2019 6:35 am

LUW wrote:
Mon Feb 11, 2019 6:21 am
Such a beautiful model! Looks terrific!
And I envy your work - not that I was any good in the past, but nowadays my eyes won't permit me that kind of job.
And you a brain surgeon!
Cheers,
David
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LUW
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Re: 1914 Jeannin Stahltaube 1/32 scale by Wingnut Wings build

Post by LUW » Mon Feb 11, 2019 8:37 am

David MG wrote:
Mon Feb 11, 2019 6:35 am
LUW wrote:
Mon Feb 11, 2019 6:21 am
Such a beautiful model! Looks terrific!
And I envy your work - not that I was any good in the past, but nowadays my eyes won't permit me that kind of job.
And you a brain surgeon!
Well, I can distinguish 7 different types of poo just by the smell.
:checkered_flag: Luciano :checkered_flag:

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You know why Italians speak with their hands? Because they have to work a lot on their engines.

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