Strippers!

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Alex_W
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Strippers!

Post by Alex_W » Tue Nov 19, 2019 5:54 pm

I knew that would get your attention.

I've used several methods for stripping the paint off of models that I am restoring or customizing. With resin I typically use Simple Green Concentrate at full strength. It take some time (up to a week) but the paint falls off and there is no damage to the model. It also cleans up with water. Simple Green will also strip the chrome from plastic parts overnight. A few drops in Future will produce a "wet look" finish as well.

For diecast and white metal I has used either carb cleaner or Jasco Premium Paint and Epoxy Remover. I try carb cleaner first because it is easier to use and not as toxic, but the Jasco would lift anything and everything. it is so hot it will destroy plastics and fiberglass. Chemical gloves and a well ventilated area are a must.

Times being what they are, Jasco is getting harder and harder to find at a reasonable price, so I decided to try one of those "new age" products. My expectations were low.

I purchased a bottle of CitriStrip Gel and went to work on an old Corgi. The stuff smells like oranges and is safe to use indoors. I wear standard Nitrile gloves when applying and removing the product, but it didn't burn at all when i got some on my arm. Clean up is with water and it can go down the drain.

Wow am I impressed! In less than 20 minutes the paint was soft and could be removed with a toothbrush and a rinse. Some areas too a second application, but the time saved in cleanup and disposal more than make up for that. And I don't need a hazmat suit to use it!

CDM
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Re: Strippers!

Post by CDM » Wed Nov 20, 2019 4:02 am

Do you need to use paint stripper....??

Over the years I have stripped literally hundreds of models for myself or for others. Clearly you will need to dismantle the model back to all its parts first.

I have always used NitrOmors. Its a green jelly like stuff you pour over the model. Some models the paint will come off very quickly, others you might need a second go. It comes in a green can in two sizes and is available in the UK from Halfords or from B&Q find it their paint area.

I strip a lot of Metro 6R4s and its interesting to note that on the first partwork Computervision version the paint comes off very quickly. Later versions the paint is very different and sometimes takes a bit more effort particularly the Rothmans version.

Also over the years to save money manufacturers are using less and less paint on their model. Oxford Diecast for example don't undercoat its just one very good top coat only.

So, in recent years depending upon the model I don't strip every model. Clearly if a model is covered in graphics it will have to be stripped or a light rub down might actually remove these graphics. Lightly rub down the model to get the shine off/remove graphics and use this layer of paint as a layer of undercoat, then add one more light undercoat and then your tops.

I would suggest that you do this only if all the shut lines are clearly visible. If they are already disappearing with the manufactures thick paint it need stripping, you will only make it worse.

If you have a model with opening parts the shut lines are so tight adding more paint wont help it will have to be stripped. I am just in the middle of repainting a Togi Models Alfa Romeo 1600, an old school model with wide shut lines, so I lightly rubbed down the red paint added one coat of grey primer, two coats of black top rubbed down and two/three coats of lacquer and its looking the business. I also have a repaint on an EFE bus on the bench, a light rub down a grey undercoat, two coats of red and we have us a red bus!!

Using the manufactures paint as a base, is less toxic, less messy, and saves using horrible paint stripper.

Chris

Alex_W
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Re: Strippers!

Post by Alex_W » Wed Nov 20, 2019 12:04 pm

CDM wrote:
Wed Nov 20, 2019 4:02 am
Do you need to use paint stripper....??

Over the years I have stripped literally hundreds of models for myself or for others. Clearly you will need to dismantle the model back to all its parts first.

I have always used NitrOmors. Its a green jelly like stuff you pour over the model. Some models the paint will come off very quickly, others you might need a second go. It comes in a green can in two sizes and is available in the UK from Halfords or from B&Q find it their paint area.

I strip a lot of Metro 6R4s and its interesting to note that on the first partwork Computervision version the paint comes off very quickly. Later versions the paint is very different and sometimes takes a bit more effort particularly the Rothmans version.

Also over the years to save money manufacturers are using less and less paint on their model. Oxford Diecast for example don't undercoat its just one very good top coat only.

So, in recent years depending upon the model I don't strip every model. Clearly if a model is covered in graphics it will have to be stripped or a light rub down might actually remove these graphics. Lightly rub down the model to get the shine off/remove graphics and use this layer of paint as a layer of undercoat, then add one more light undercoat and then your tops.

I would suggest that you do this only if all the shut lines are clearly visible. If they are already disappearing with the manufactures thick paint it need stripping, you will only make it worse.

If you have a model with opening parts the shut lines are so tight adding more paint wont help it will have to be stripped. I am just in the middle of repainting a Togi Models Alfa Romeo 1600, an old school model with wide shut lines, so I lightly rubbed down the red paint added one coat of grey primer, two coats of black top rubbed down and two/three coats of lacquer and its looking the business. I also have a repaint on an EFE bus on the bench, a light rub down a grey undercoat, two coats of red and we have us a red bus!!

Using the manufactures paint as a base, is less toxic, less messy, and saves using horrible paint stripper.

Chris
It looks like NitrOmors is very similar to what had been using (based on the precautions on the label and the active ingredients). The CitriStrip is much more pleasant to use.

As a rule I strip all of my projects down to the metal because I almost always make at least a few tweaks or modifications. I find that feathering paint to the metal doesn't work too well on most models because of the small area and the thickness of the paint relative to scale.

I know what you mean regarding the variations in paint. I've had old models where the paint just fell right of and others (particularly old Solido models) that took days to get clean.

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Tom
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Re: Strippers!

Post by Tom » Wed Nov 20, 2019 12:26 pm

I've been told that used brake fluid is a great paint stripper for models. It did work on the bulkhead of my mate's car when he overfilled the reservoir. :lol:

Alex_W
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Re: Strippers!

Post by Alex_W » Wed Nov 20, 2019 12:53 pm

Tom wrote:
Wed Nov 20, 2019 12:26 pm
I've been told that used brake fluid is a great paint stripper for models. It did work on the bulkhead of my mate's car when he overfilled the reservoir. :lol:
It is indeed! So is carb cleaner.

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Jager
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Re: Strippers!

Post by Jager » Fri Nov 22, 2019 8:00 am

In Australia we have a product called "Polystripper" that works well on diecast models. However I discovered that it's best not to do a Google Images search for the tin :o :shock: :o
“Racing is life. Anything before or after is just waiting.” - Steve McQueen

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Jean B.
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Re: Strippers!

Post by Jean B. » Fri Nov 29, 2019 12:55 pm

I always use acetone for metal models. It's cheap, non-cancerogene and takes off any kind of paint from all durable materials. For plastic parts I usually take Revell Color Clean brush cleaner. Strips off paints and chrome platings without harming the parts and can be used several times.

Alex_W
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Re: Strippers!

Post by Alex_W » Fri Nov 29, 2019 7:10 pm

Jean B. wrote:
Fri Nov 29, 2019 12:55 pm
I always use acetone for metal models. It's cheap, non-cancerogene and takes off any kind of paint from all durable materials. For plastic parts I usually take Revell Color Clean brush cleaner. Strips off paints and chrome platings without harming the parts and can be used several times.
I use acetone sometimes as well. I typically use Simple Green for plastic, It is safe and biodegradable (it wont even kill grass). An overnight soak works for chrome on plastic. It is great for taking paint of resin, but it takes a bit longer. I don't know if it is available by that brand name outside the US, but it is green and smells like licorice, if that helps. Plus it is very inexpensive. I buy it by the gallon because it can be diluted and used to clean just about anything. I've even used it to clean up gasoline spills on asphalt.

BTW, non-acetone nail polish remover is excellent for removing tampo graphics (like those on old Minichamps models). I use it sparingly to clean up cars to which I am adding tobacco graphics.

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Jean B.
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Re: Strippers!

Post by Jean B. » Thu Dec 05, 2019 1:14 pm

Alex_W wrote:
Fri Nov 29, 2019 7:10 pm
I use acetone sometimes as well. I typically use Simple Green for plastic, It is safe and biodegradable (it wont even kill grass). An overnight soak works for chrome on plastic. It is great for taking paint of resin, but it takes a bit longer. I don't know if it is available by that brand name outside the US, but it is green and smells like licorice, if that helps. Plus it is very inexpensive. I buy it by the gallon because it can be diluted and used to clean just about anything. I've even used it to clean up gasoline spills on asphalt.

BTW, non-acetone nail polish remover is excellent for removing tampo graphics (like those on old Minichamps models). I use it sparingly to clean up cars to which I am adding tobacco graphics.
I've never seen that stuff before, but having a look at google shows that it is indeed available in Germany with German description, so I'll give it a try, soon... :mrgreen:

Alex_W
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Re: Strippers!

Post by Alex_W » Thu Dec 05, 2019 2:30 pm

Jean B. wrote:
Thu Dec 05, 2019 1:14 pm
Alex_W wrote:
Fri Nov 29, 2019 7:10 pm
I use acetone sometimes as well. I typically use Simple Green for plastic, It is safe and biodegradable (it wont even kill grass). An overnight soak works for chrome on plastic. It is great for taking paint of resin, but it takes a bit longer. I don't know if it is available by that brand name outside the US, but it is green and smells like licorice, if that helps. Plus it is very inexpensive. I buy it by the gallon because it can be diluted and used to clean just about anything. I've even used it to clean up gasoline spills on asphalt.

BTW, non-acetone nail polish remover is excellent for removing tampo graphics (like those on old Minichamps models). I use it sparingly to clean up cars to which I am adding tobacco graphics.
I've never seen that stuff before, but having a look at google shows that it is indeed available in Germany with German description, so I'll give it a try, soon... :mrgreen:
What I like about it is that it won't damage even the softest plastic. It works slowly, but it works.

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