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Chrome paint

Posted: Thu Jun 25, 2015 6:03 pm
by Marcus143
Hi everyone,
I have three 1:43 cars that are in need of a slight touch up of chrome paint on their bumpers.
Can anyone suggest which product would be suitable?
I have seen spray cans of chrome mirror effect paint on ebay, which I thought I could use with a small brush, but I'm not sure.

Re: Chrome paint

Posted: Fri Jun 26, 2015 1:32 am
by Ozmac
Model builders tend to go for Alclad when they want the really shiny stuff. There are a few different types of Alclad available, I believe, but I don't know that much about it.

All the paint makers for models have a "chrome" in their ranges, I have a few of them, such as Tamiya, Gunze Mr Hobby, Humbrol, and they are all quite different, and I don't think they're all that good.

Re: Chrome paint

Posted: Fri Jun 26, 2015 2:10 am
by rotormotor
This from a kitset builder on a rotary forum..I asked him specifically whether he used bare metal foil on his brightwork...

Image

"The bumpers in the old plastic kit are chrome and that's what i ended up using, although the ones in the resin kit are slightly thinner and look better. For the resin bumpers I paint them black and use Kousette Ginsan chrome buffing powder, the stuff is magic! I'm still having dramas getting the resin bumpers smooth enough to buff but when i do I'll swap them over."

Re: Chrome paint

Posted: Sat Jun 27, 2015 3:56 am
by k1w1taxi
Marcus, Alclad is definitely the only way to go if you want a true chrome paint finish - problem is it is only designed to be sprayed so you need an airbrush. Is also tricky if you are only doing a repair. Bare metal foil is another good option just make sure the foil is fresh and that you use a very sharp blade (new is best)

Lars, Kit? Resin? Spill the beans buddy.

Cheers
Lee

Re: Chrome paint

Posted: Sat Jun 27, 2015 4:23 am
by rotormotor
I think a member on the ausrotary forum makes resin kits...like major bits of the bandai 1/20 r100 kit for sale..maybe also the rx2,3 as well. that rx2 is twin headlight so unknown scale or brand for that one...suspect 1/24.

Re: Chrome paint

Posted: Fri Jul 03, 2015 2:20 pm
by Jean B.
Meanwhile I use Alclad chrome paint. Bare metal foil is excellent for small pieces, that means plain or only slightly embossed areas. If you want to chrome full objects like bumpers, grilles and so one, it is very unsatisfying with BMF, furthermore BMF has a very slight structure, on larger areas you can polish as heavy as you want, the surface of BMF stays a little bit "crinkled".

Alclad is almost perfect. Just make sure that you have a very shiny, high-gloss black surface. It is not necessary to use the (expensive) Alclad black primer, I always use simple spray paint from the supermarket, this works excellent! Use the airbrush with low pressure, and try on some scrap parts how many waves of chrome paint you need. You have two choices: a little less chrome paint, then the part is high-shining but a little bit dark - or some more chrome paint, then it gets a little bit dull but shows a bright/white silver. Unfortunately there is no "ideal" in-between. Two minutes after spraying get with a very wide, soft, dry and clean brush over the parts, this removes the overspray and enhances the chrome-shine.

But - after all - this seems the best way to get a really professional chromed surface for models :D

Re: Chrome paint

Posted: Wed Aug 15, 2018 6:44 am
by Tom
The chrome paint in the OP was used on this Maserati. It's actually a very shiny silver with extremely small metalflake. I bought my small aerosol for EUR 2.50 from a general discount store. As you can see it's not suitable for repairs to existing chrome and for new builds I'd probably use either BMF or Alclad. It is however a considerable upgrade over the original silver paint.

Image08_15_18_12_54_01_20180602_122914 by Tom Sfotoos, on Flickr

The 'before' shot Image

And after the chrome paint
Image
Image

My photography made the initial shot look worse than the model did in hand, and even the 'after' pictures do not show how good it is now.

From previous use I know that it's important not to touch the painted surface with your fingers. Using a clear lacquer to finish it and add durability won't work as it attacks the chrome. I used a 'third hand' to hold the parts while painting and let them dry for a couple of days, using tweezers to reattach them.

I have a Molotow chrome marker that I use for small touch ups.

Re: Chrome paint

Posted: Wed Aug 15, 2018 8:11 am
by dcast
Did you spray clearcoat on top of the chrome paint in the bumpers?

Re: Chrome paint

Posted: Wed Aug 15, 2018 8:17 am
by Tom
Nope, as I explained it attacks the chrome and ends up a crumpled silvery mess, as I'd found out earlier. I built a plastic kit years ago where I used chrome paint to substitute for the lack of proper chrome. After spraying clearcoat I ruined it, and wasn't able to restore it.

Re: Chrome paint

Posted: Thu Aug 16, 2018 7:14 am
by The Maltings
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Molotow-Liquid ... chrome+pen

Have also used one of these with some success. Come with differing nib sizes as well

Re: Chrome paint

Posted: Tue Aug 21, 2018 1:18 am
by Jean B.
The Maltings wrote:
Thu Aug 16, 2018 7:14 am
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Molotow-Liquid ... chrome+pen

Have also used one of these with some success. Come with differing nib sizes as well
I'd like to agree! These are perfect especially for smaller repairs (dots/spots) as well as for "chroming" edges or window frames. Important: only apply with one move, let it dry for several hours (without touching, polishing etc.), and then repeat, if necessary (for example on dark colours). If painting over and over, it ends up in a mess! The larger the part/area to cover, the danger grows that you will see streams and/or metallic flake in the result.